That Compost Glow

There’s nothing like homemade compost to make plants glow and grow!

It’s the foundation for nutrient rich fruit and vegetables.

An inch or so spread on all the beds once a year is like waving a magic wand.

Hey presto!

Sweet orange carrots; deep vibrant green, purple and white cabbage, kale and broccoli; pink passion ruby chard; vigorous herbs and delicate lime green lettuces.

The veggies really do glow like jewels in the low winter light.

The compost making is less glamorous but just as satisfying!

Every year at about this time I empty and remake the main heap nearest the house.

Last year, Fynn came over from northern Germany to visit and helped me.

This year Alex dug out the “black gold”.

This is the really fine stuff from the bottom of the heap which I will use mixed with leaf mould and sharp sand for potting compost

Then when the bay was empty she helped me combine and consolidate material from the other heaps nearby.

We layered brown woody stuff like spent bean vines and half rotted woodchip with nitrogen rich greens like grass cuttings, chopped up comfrey leaves and vegetable peelings.

Comfrey growing near the compost bay is “harvested” two or three times a year and used as an activator in the heap

This time I remembered to sprinkle each layer with QR activator – a biodynamic powder made of dried plants/herbs mixed vigorously with water.

No, it’s not wee! It’s Quick Results activator

The last time I used this it really did seem to speed up the composting process.

Unfortunately you can’t buy it from Chase Organics anymore as the company was taken over by a bigger concern so I’ve sent off to France for some biodynamic compost preparations which I’ll try out next time.

Jonathan was scarifying the lawn so we used the grass cuttings as part of the mix. This coming week I’ll add a lot more material brought up from the heap at the orchard end of the garden.

The new heap is already warm and toasty.

It’s shrunk somewhat as the billions of organisms get to work decomposing and transforming the material into the rich dark compost that we’llĀ  dig out and use in a year’s time.

 

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